Marking at Nightingale Academy

Students' learning

Two skills and a target

In our drive to improve feedback to students via marking, we have decided to amend “two stars and a wish” to make it sharper and more precise for students. It will now become “two skills and a target”.

The “two skills” identifies two skills the student has demonstrated. These relate directly to the lesson objectives, success criteria or literacy skills. The comments are intended to be precise, and so they avoid phrases such as “you worked hard” or “you improved your writing”. They drill down to exactly what the student did well, for example, “You used colloquial language to appeal to your target audience- well done” or “You improved your writing by correcting capital letter and full stop mistakes when you proofread. ”

Rather than “wish”, we will now use “target”. Again, this will be linked linked to the lesson objectives, success criteria or literacy skills. Teachers will set targets which are SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time limited). For example, “In your next piece of extended writing start a new paragraph each time you move on to a new point”, or “In each lesson this week use the key words in all written and verbal responses.”

The feedback will be set out in a way that is easily accessible to students, for example if the lesson objective has been: “How do we set out direct speech accurately?” the feedback might be:

Skill: You started a new line for a new speaker when setting out speech.

Skill: You used inverted commas for the words spoken by the characters.

Target: Use a capital letter each time you move to a new speaker. Do this in every lesson this week


Monitoring of marking

Marking is regularly monitored within and across faculties. We use the assessment grid below to ascertain the grade of marking for each teacher.  They are set improvement targets which they then work towards for the next round of monitoring. Teachers also use the grid as a self-assessment tool.

Monitoring of Marking

Date:        Name of teacher:

Focus group/class:      Monitored by:

Good practice identified:


Areas for development:


Grade:


Marking Policy

Introduction

Regular and focussed written or oral feedback to learners about the quality of their work, levels of effort, attainment grades and future areas of development, is fundamental to the principles of assessment for learning.  By providing learners with prompt, consistent and accurate feedback focused upon learning outcomes and curricular targets, it is more likely that learners will understand and take ownership of their educational journey.  This learning partnership should seek to recognise, reflect upon and celebrate achievements, while at the same time it should work together to identify issues and future progress.

As part of a planned and targeted personalised curriculum, learners should fully understand the importance of learning objectives and success criteria.  It is fundamental to raising self esteem and achievement that teachers and learners co-operate to reflect and review learning so that future planning and implementation are led by the learners’ needs.  The teacher should actively plan and link learning objectives to actual outcomes, ensuring that marking provides learners with constructive feedback which joins up the learning process for the individual.

Principles

In order to support a strong and informative assessment system, quality marking and feedback should follow these principles:


  • learners should be encouraged as much as possible to take responsibility for the assessment of their own learning , particularly through the development of self and peer assessment and marking
  • marking should be legible and non intrusive on the learner’s efforts (e.g. in pencil)
  • learners should be given the time and opportunity to read comments and use these as a platform for a dialogue about learning
  • time should be allocated to learners to address the curricular targets set, and to make the recommended changes to their work before moving on to their next task The teacher should revisit these regularly with the learner to ensure that progress has been made
  • pieces of work should periodically be marked with a National Curriculum level or according to examination grades/criteria. This should happen at least once a half term.  All other marking should be comment only; these comments should include what the learner has achieved linked to the learning objective and success criteria, together with a target for improvement
  • the traffic light system should be promoted as a tool for feedback, particularly in the areas of effort and quick responses.  In addition, learners should be encouraged to choose whether to put their work in a red, amber or green tray depending on their level of understanding
  • staff should follow the directions given in the whole Academy literacy policy to support the improvement of student literacy skills. For example, use should be made of the student organiser to write key words and common misspellings as advised by the literacy team
  • accurate records of levels and grades should be kept by the teacher to inform and evidence the learner tracking system.  A high quality marking system ensures that numerical attainment and targets link back to curricular targets and achievements, which in turn can be tracked back to learning objectives and the National Curriculum.
  • As part of their discussions with their learning guide, learners will explore what working hard ‘looks like, sounds like and feels like’ for them. Learners will also explore the learning activity into which they put the most effort. This will assist in an analysis of preferred learning styles and support our aspiration to personalise the learning  for our learners
  • Learners will be encouraged to reflect on the effort they have put into individual pieces of work and record these in their learning journals
  • Where areas of learning/subjects wish to assign an effort grade, this should form part of a discussion with the learner about their progress
  • Effort grades should be assigned using the traffic light system
  • Learners should also have an opportunity to discuss their effort with their peers, and where they are involved in group tasks, this should form part of the debrief on completion of the task
  • As part of staff training, we will design a developmental continuum to explore the specific observable behaviours associated with effort.
  • An opening paragraph that creates the vision for the subject/area of learning.
  • The Aims of your subject
  • The Aims of your subject/area of learning in relation to the aims of Nightingale Academy
  • reward success and learn from failure
  • continuously improve on our previous best
  • secure the equal status and value of all members of the Academy community
  • work in partnership with the Academy community to enhance the quality of learning.
  • fulfil the needs of all learners and provide genuine equality of opportunity
  • ensure that all learners
  • are happy and secure
  • enjoy learning
  • are excited by the challenge and opportunity to learn
  • make significant progress
  • achieve at high levels and fulfil their academic and personal potential
  • develop responsibility for their own learning and skills for learning
  • encourage ownership of learning so that learners develop the fundamental attitudes, skills and behaviours to become successful independent and interdependent learners
  • provide high quality educational standards for all
  • good teaching and effective learning
  • good behaviour and discipline
  • good levels of attendance and punctuality
  • continually explore and implement new and effective approaches to teaching and learning
  • create a climate which recognises, rewards and celebrates success
  • prepare all learners to continue to succeed and grow in the world beyond the Academy so that they can
  • handle uncertainty and respond to change
  • create and implement new ideas and way of doing things
  • make reasonable risk assessments and act upon them in their personal and working lives
  • develop the enterprise and citizenship capability of all learners through the promotion of
  • Knowledge and understanding – organisation, innovation, risk and change
  • Skills – decision making, personal and social, leadership, risk management and presentation;
  • Attitudes – self-reliance, open mindedness, respect and commitment to making a difference
  • Qualities – adaptability, perseverance, determination, flexibility, creativeness and initiative
  • On two sides of A4 paper max (ideally one side), the ‘content’ of your subject/area
  • Assessment Criteria and Curriculum targets
  • Topic/Theme Title
  • Links to prior learning (i.e. reflect and connect)
  • Learning outcomes
  • Success Criteria
  • Main learning activities:
  • Introduction of new information/key words, vocab.
  • Process of learning
  • Learning styles covered
  • Resources for learning including ICT
  • Assessment for learning processes
  • Debrief (i.e. review) of activity
  • Strategies for building collaborative classroom community
  • Contribution to the specialism of Literacy and Physical Education
  • Reflect and connect to next activity
  • when formal observation of teaching is taking place
  • when we are monitoring the quality of planning


Effort Grades

Providing feedback on the effort that learners have put into a piece of work needs to be consistent across the Academy. At Nightingale Academy, we will use a variety of ways to produce meaningful effort grades for our learners.

SCHEMES OF WORK

The development of Schemes of Work will be a collaborative effort so that they are owned by all the staff in the Academy. To ensure high quality, consistency, continuity and creativity, we intend to involve the leadership group in the development of our Schemes of Work in the Summer term.

Success Criteria

A high quality Scheme of Work at Nightingale Academy should have:

Introduction

  • An opening paragraph that creates the vision for the subject/area of learning.

In other words, what will a successful learner in your subject look like, sound like and feel like? What will they know, understand, be able to do and be like as a result of studying your subject/area of learning? – why study this area of learning? In producing this section, you might want to consider your love/excitement about your subject/area of learning? This is a useful initial discussion to have with the rest of your staff and the students.

  • The Aims of your subject

From national curriculum/agreed syllabus

  • The Aims of your subject/area of learning in relation to the aims of Nightingale Academy

    These  aims listed below should to be into your scheme and then reflect on how your subject/area of learning support the achievement of the aims, including what the learning and teaching will look like, sound like and feel like in your subject/area.


Nightingale Academy provides a values rich environment, dedicated to the affirmation, formation and high standards of achievement for all our learners; in other words, that all learners in the Academy are enabled to make their best better. These principles are the rights of all the learners, both student and staff and should be the guiding principles underlying all Academy policies and procedures.

Our aims are to:

  • reward success and learn from failure
  • continuously improve on our previous best
  • secure the equal status and value of all members of the Academy community
  • work in partnership with the Academy community to enhance the quality of learning
  • fulfil the needs of all learners and provide genuine equality of opportunity
  • ensure that all learners
  • are happy and secure
  • enjoy learning
  • are excited by the challenge and opportunity to learn
  • make significant progress
  • achieve at high levels and fulfil their academic and personal potential
  • develop responsibility for their own learning and skills for learning
  • encourage ownership of learning so that learners develop the fundamental attitudes, skills and behaviours to become successful independent and interdependent learners
  • provide high quality educational standards for all
  • good teaching and effective learning
  • good behaviour and discipline
  • good levels of attendance and punctuality
  • continually explore and implement new and effective approaches to teaching and learning
  • create a climate which recognises, rewards and celebrates success
  • prepare all learners to continue to succeed and grow in the world beyond the Academy so that they can
  • handle uncertainty and respond to change
  • create and implement new ideas and way of doing things
  • make reasonable risk assessments and act upon them in their personal and working lives
  • develop the enterprise and citizenship capability of all learners through the promotion of
  • Knowledge and understanding – organisation, innovation, risk and change
  • Skills – decision making, personal and social, leadership, risk management and presentation;
  • Attitudes – self-reliance, open mindedness, respect and commitment to making a difference
  • Qualities – adaptability, perseverance, determination, flexibility, creativeness and initiative

It is our belief that our mission, vision and aims will be achieved through the creation of a high quality collaborative learning environment where all members of the Academy community feel safe (emotionally and physically), work hard and work fair.


Long Term Plans – the big picture

  • On two sides of A4 paper max (ideally one side), the ‘content’ of your subject/area

This could be presented as a mind map, or a list, a table or however your area feel they can paint the big picture of the subject – we are not looking for detail here – topic headings/themes is enough – it helps anyone looking at your scheme of learning to understand what students will know by the time they finish studying the subject

  • Assessment Criteria and Curriculum targets

Include here the assessment criteria (levels) as produced by your subject/area of learning. The purpose is to show what progress across the levels looks like over time.

Medium Term Plans

A high quality medium term plan will include:

  • Topic/Theme Title
  • Links to prior learning (i.e. reflect and connect)
  • Learning outcomes
  • Success Criteria
  • Main learning activities:

- Introduction of new information/key words, vocab

- Process of learning

- Learning styles covered

- Resources for learning including ICT

- Assessment for learning processes

- Debrief (i.e. review) of activity

  • Strategies for building collaborative classroom community
  • Contribution to the specialism of Literacy and Physical Education
  • Reflect and connect to next activity

Although medium term plans must contain the above criteria, they can be produced in the format that fits the learning styles of your staff. The staff handbook contains a couple of proformas which you may find helpful.

Short Term Plans

There are two alternative lesson plans contained in this handbook. They have been designed to suit the learning styles of the teachers; both contain the same information and consistent format for ensuring that the elements of effective teaching and learning are contained in every lesson. If medium term planning is high quality and rigorous, detailed lesson plans will be required:

  • when formal observation of teaching is taking place
  • when we are monitoring the quality of planning

Details of individual lessons should be recorded in the teacher handbook on all other occasions. For guidance, please consult with your HoD/HoF.

On the planner pages, there are 6 icons are provided as a checklist that a variety of learning styles and groupings are being addressed in the lesson. This is not meant to be an exhaustive list but a reminder to provide variety of approaches in the lesson

visual / auditory / kinaesthetic / individual / pair work / group work